Wu-Tang Meet the Indie Culture, Vol. 2: Enter the Dubstep

Dubstep fans have a lot to be happy about, the genre is on the up-and-up, rising in popularity at unprecedented rates, as 2009 may have been its best year yet.  Yet with all the stylistic variations evolving out of dubstep, and with all the high school teenagers showing up at shows, and with the sheer amount of music being released online right now, one almost has to wonder (perhaps even worry) if dubstep will inevitably join it’s stylistic cousin, drum-n-bass.  Some have argued that dubstep sort of evolved from DnB, as it’s no secret that many producers of the latter are now releasing dubstep, but others have countered that dubstep is a completely separate root of the musical tree, and is on a different path altogether.  Whatever the case may be, like any genre, when you explore it in detail, you find a staggering amount of material to consider, but have to explore to find what you’ll really love.  Today’s post continues in the direction of dub, here are some new cuts that have caught my ear.

Wu-Tang – Do It Big (Baobinga & I’d Remix)

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I don’t think it’s any mystery that Wu-Tang has been a big influence on a lot of dubstep producers, as I’m sure holds true for any genre.  I’ve heard Wu-Tang in everything from deep house to death metal, and I’d even heard Wu-Tang in dubstep remixes, but until recently, I had never heard what an official collabo might sound like.  This new release is incredibly hard-hitting, and a must-hear for fans of either.  It seriously sounds like Top 40 from the future, let’s just hope mainstream music could ever even be so cool.

Kryptic Minds – Six Degrees

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Turn out the lights while you read this paragraph, because this track is some serious darkness.  Kryptic Minds is an example of the above-mentioned DnB-gone-Dubstep producer.  Bear in mind that I’m absolutely not knocking the migration, I think these experienced producers know what’s up and make some of the best stuff.  His newest release, One Of Us, continues down the dark path with sub-dominating lows, an excellent manifestation of the brooding sort of aggression that makes you feel like thrashing, but instead you just keep nodding your head and two stepping with that telling scowl on your face.

DFRNT – On The Move

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Alright, now that we got that out of our system, let’s lighten things up a little.  DFRNT‘s new release Metafiction is a great bit of chilled out dubstep that brings in hints of dub techno and at some points (in tracks like this) a little taste of DnB.  A newcomer to the scene having discovered dubstep in 2007, DFRNT is solidifying his case as a front-runner for this new generation of producers.  I wouldn’t necessarily call this feel-good music, but it’s certainly a little more relaxing without sounding watered-down.

El Rakkas – Era EW (DFRNT Remix)

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Finally, duo El Rakkas released a split EP with the afforementioned DFRNT, which has this excellent remix.  Elements of freezing cold dub techno are in there, while the smokey, dark synth pads mix very well with the bassline, keeping the temperature comfortably right in the middle.  Chilled and subdued, this kind of track stands in complete contrast with the first track I posted up today.  It just goes to show how widely the world of dubstep has grown, let’s hope that it continues to grow, but doesn’t get stifled by the sort of ignorant bliss that has spelled out (maybe only temporarily) the downfall of genres in the past.